Sappi Southern Africa
Sustainability Report

SHARING VALUE IN
THE RURAL ECONOMY
EMPOWERING COMMUNITIES
TO CREATE THEIR OWN WEALTH:
THE ABASHINTSHI

Fires on Sappi's plantations are a major challenge.

 

2015:

Together with DevCom, a development communications specialist company, we launched the Abashintshi ('Changers' in isiZulu) programme.

Three aims:

To decrease intentional fires, establish closer engagement with communities and achieve social change.

Implemented by:

Young people from rural communities living in and around our operations.

Four key elements

Asset-based community development (ABCD) model aims to empower community members to use what they have, instead of focusing on what they need or dont have.

Youth life skills training

Ifa Lethu which documents the legacy of the elderly in the community in order to continue with successful practices and learn from mistakes.

Holiday programmes with children

Value created

Programme began in KwaZulu-Natal, now expanded to Mpumalanga

2015 18 Abashintshi in nine communities

2017 88 Abashintshi in 43 communities

2018 117 Abashintshi across 65 Sappi communities

Businesses range from brickmaking projects to poultry and pig farms, and from crèches to home industries.

SHARED
VALUE IMPACT


General

  • Analysis by Poverty Stoplight indicates that the Abashintshi are better able to make plans and earn a living.
  • Reduction in fires a significant benefit to Sappi.

Specific

  • ABCD projects cumulative 564 (2015-2017).
  • 190 projects in 2018 run by 268 people.
  • 2018 July holiday programme for 10 days, 1,500 kids per day.
  • 10,000 community contacts per month.
  • 48 Abashintshi have businesses in 2018. Earned ZAR320,000 profit in seven months, with profits ranging from ZAR900 to ZAR9,000 per month.