Sappi Southern Africa
Sustainability Report

SHARING VALUE IN THE RURAL ECONOMY
HITTING THE SWEET SPOT

Project area:

Richards Bay to Mozambique along the coast in KwaZulu-Natal.

Sappi Khulisa growers need an income while they wait for their trees to reach maturity, which is where the Sappi-sponsored African Honey Bee (AHB) Project comes in.
The AHB project trains people, offers mentoring and support and provides a market for the pure honey. All imported honey is irradiated by law, making it far less healthy than locally produced pure honey.
IMPROVING CASH FLOW
=
IMPROVED INCOME FROM SMALL-SCALE EUCALYPTUS
By not harvesting at four years and waiting till seven years to harvest, the small-scale grower can increase his/her profit by 40%.
FOUR YEARS
ZAR25,000
PER YEAR
ZAR6,000
SEVEN YEARS
ZAR70,000
PER YEAR
ZAR10,000

Increasing a small-scale grower's income by ZAR10,000 per year.

Alleviating cash flow, so trees can be left to grow till seven years before they are harvested.

Over the past two years, AHB has trained 1,482 people in KZN. Of this number, 962 people are actively keeping bees and producing and selling honey.

SHARED
VALUE IMPACT

  • Reduction in honey hunter fires - honey hunters are now honey farmers.
  • Increased timber yields.
  • Additional income for Sappi Khulisa farmers - poverty reduction.
  • Self-sustaining.
  • An assessment by Poverty Spotlight of 140 sample families in the programme found that:
    - 14% are keeping poultry
    - 24% are growing vegetables
    - 60% are selling vegetables, and
    - 95% are keeping bees.